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Nebraska governor has no interest in keeping up with the Joneses, suggesting that using weed can ‘create psychosis’

Asked about neighbour South Dakota legalizing medical and recreational cannabis, Pete Ricketts squashes expectations Nebraska will do the same.

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    Should Nebraska legalize cannabis? Not unless the citizenry wants more traffic fatalities, young people getting a hold of weed and more psychotics, suggests Governor Pete Ricketts.

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    Ricketts is not alone in his reticence to befriend bud. Just before the election, Republican Governor Tate Reeves noted in a tweet about his state’s medical cannabis question, “Most non-stoners say we should be careful & deliberate. Initiative 65 is the opposite.”

    Stoners and non-stoners alike apparently disagreed, voting in favour of Initiative 65, which calls for allowing medical cannabis treatment for 20-plus qualifying conditions, permitting people to possess as much as 71 grams of weed at a time, and taxing marijuana sales at the state sales tax rate.

    Another medical cannabis question on the ballot, Alternative 65A, would have left the legislature to work out most of the details surrounding related rules. That ballot, however, did not find favour with voting Mississippians.

    Asked about neighbour South Dakota legalizing medical and recreational cannabis, Pete Ricketts squashes expectations Nebraska will do the same.

    Voters approve legal marijuana in South Dakota

    South Dakota voters just said yes to legalizing marijuana for recreational and medical purposes.

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    South Dakota has voted to legalize marijuana.

    The state’s Constitutional Amendment A, which voters approved on Election Day, legalizes marijuana possession and use for adults 21 and older. It also allows individuals to grow up to three plants if they live in a jurisdiction with no licensed marijuana retailers. And it allows distribution and sales, with a 15 percent tax. Local jurisdictions will be able to ban marijuana businesses within their borders.

    Separately, South Dakota also legalized medical marijuana on Election Day — setting up a system that will let patients with debilitating conditions obtain the drug under state law.

    Marijuana remains illegal under federal law. But starting with President Barack Obama’s administration, the federal government has generally allowed states to legalize cannabis with minimal federal interference.

    Live results for 2020’s marijuana legalization ballot measures

    Before Election Day, 11 states and Washington, DC, had legalized marijuana, although DC doesn’t allow recreational sales. Change has moved quickly across the US: A decade ago, zero states allowed marijuana for recreational purposes.

    Supporters of legalization argue that it eliminates the harms of marijuana prohibition: the hundreds of thousands of arrests around the US, the racial disparities behind those arrests, and the billions of dollars that flow from the black market for illicit marijuana to drug cartels that then use the money for violent operations around the world. All of this, legalization advocates say, will outweigh any of the potential downsides — such as increased cannabis use — that might come with legalization.

    Opponents, meanwhile, claim that legalization will create a huge marijuana industry that will market the drug irresponsibly. They point to America’s experiences with the alcohol and tobacco industries in particular, which have built their financial empires in large part on the backs of the heaviest consumers of their products. And they argue ending prohibition could result in far more people using pot, potentially leading to unforeseen negative health consequences.

    For more on the debate over marijuana legalization, read Vox’s explainer.

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    Marijuana legalization wins in South Dakota.