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weed head rush

Weed head rush

A headrush is a feeling of light-headedness. Headrushes usually happen if you stand up after sitting down for a long period of time. Your field of vision shrinks temporarily, and it looks like you’re blacking out, but it only makes you dizzy for a few seconds until the feeling wears off.
Headrushes can cause some embarrassment, because they occur on a slight delay, so that you’re already far from your chair when the feeling kicks in. If there’s a table or wall nearby, lean on it for support just in case. Otherwise, just sit down or stand there for a few seconds.

If you are prone to skip meals some days, or don’t get enough sleep, you are more likely to get headrushes. Frequent headrushes are crazy as hell, but get old pretty quickly.

“John usually skips breakfast, but he pulled an all-nighter and missed lunch today. Poor bastard got a headrush on his way to Biology and fell over in the hall.”

“Whoa, dude, I just headrushed like crazy. I need to stop playing TFT for a while, I’ve been on for like three hours.”

Weed head rush A headrush is a feeling of light-headedness. Headrushes usually happen if you stand up after sitting down for a long period of time. Your field of vision shrinks temporarily, and

Marijuana really does cause a headrush

MARIJUANA really does give you a headrush. In frequent cannabis users, blood flows faster through the arteries of the brain than in people who do not use the drug.

According to Jean Cadet of the National Institute on Drug Abuse in Baltimore, Maryland, the faster flow may be an attempt to compensate for a lack of oxygen in the brain caused by cannabis. He claims his findings could explain why the drug affects short-term memory.

Cadet measured blood flow in the brains of 54 frequent marijuana smokers using a method called transcranial Doppler sonography. Even in the group he describes …

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In frequent users, blood flows faster through the brain, possibly to compensate for a lack of oxygen caused by cannabis, a study suggests