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Moke: What It Is and Why It’s Unhealthy for Teens

Understanding Moke and Its Effects on the Body and Brain

Have you noticed the word “moke” being used lately, in the media and among young people? If so, you might have wondered, what is a moke?

Moke is a term for a mix of marijuana and tobacco, typically smoked with a bong, or water pipe. Mixing weed with tobacco is more common in Europe, Australia, and other parts of the world. According to some estimates, 90 percent of cannabis smokers in Europe mix marijuana with tobacco.

Furthermore, this mix is gaining popularity among American teenagers. In the United States, a marijuana and tobacco cigarette is known as a spliff.

It’s important to understand the health risks of smoking tobacco and weed together. Moreover, this tobacco and weed mix can have a detrimental impact on teen mental health .

What Happens When You Mix Marijuana and Tobacco

While both tobacco and weed have specific effects, mixing the two also has other effects on the body and mind.

A 2009 study showed that mixing cannabis and tobacco actually increases the THC content of the combined drugs. Thus, a moke produces a stronger high. In addition, both nicotine and THC produce a sensation of euphoria.

Moreover, smoking marijuana and tobacco, mixed, have resulted in what health officials call “respiratory cripples.” In 2016, doctors in St. Lucia reported an epidemic of young patients suffering from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) as a result of this combination of drugs.

COPD is a debilitating, progressive disease that directly affects the lungs and cannot be reversed. Patients with the disease are confined to a bed with oxygen tanks to aid in breathing.

Moke Leads to an Increased Risk of Addiction

Smoking mokes may create a greater risk of teen substance use disorder . A 2008 study conducted with users between ages 17 and 35 showed that using tobacco with marijuana contributes to cannabis dependence symptoms.

Furthermore, a 2016 study confirmed these results. Researchers analyzed responses from 33,687 cannabis users from 18 countries who participated in the 2014 Global Drug Survey, an anonymous online survey of drug use.

Subsequently, they found that people who did not mix cannabis with tobacco were much more motivated to quit and thus more likely to seek professional help for cannabis and nicotine addiction. Therefore, researches concluded that people who regularly mix tobacco with cannabis are at greater risk of psychological dependence than people who use the drugs separately.

“Mixing tobacco with cannabis lowers the motivation to quit using these drugs,” said lead author Chandni Hindocha, a doctoral student at the Clinical Psychopharmacology Unit of University College London.

Tobacco, Marijuana, and the Brain

Both nicotine and marijuana interact with the body’s endocannabinoid system (ECS). Furthermore, the ECS has receptors in the brain and body that help regulate basic metabolic functions, including pain, pleasure, mood, digestion, and motor control.

A large number of these receptors are found in the hippocampus and amygdala, the parts of the brain that play important roles in remembering, decision making, emotional responses, and addiction. Therefore, drugs that alter the functioning of these receptors can negatively affect functioning in these areas.

In a study done at the Center for Brain Health at the University of Texas at Dallas, scientists uncovered significant differences in the brains of people who use both tobacco and marijuana, as compared to the brains of those who only use marijuana. Researchers studied the size of the hippocampus as it related to memory function.

They found that the combination of nicotine and marijuana had a unique effect on the brain, as compared to the brains of people who did not smoke or who smoked only one of the two substances.

According to the principal investigator in the study, Dr. Francesca Filby, “Our findings confirm that the interaction between marijuana and nicotine is indeed much more complicated due to the different mechanisms at play. Future studies need to address these compounding effects of substances.”

Effects of Marijuana vs. Tobacco

According to the World Health Organization, tobacco and cannabis are used respectively by 1 billion and 182 million people worldwide.

It is difficult to directly compare marijuana and tobacco in terms of the long-term changes they make in the body and brain. However, both substances are dangerous and unhealthy.

Consequently, the marijuana-tobacco mix known as a moke carries two sets of unhealthy effects.

The Mental Health Risks of Tobacco

Most Americans are very familiar with the physical health risks of smoking nicotine, including lung cancer, stroke, and heart disease. Cigarette smoking is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States, resulting in more than 480,000 deaths each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

However, smoking tobacco is also associated with substance abuse and depression . This is particularly true for teens.

What Parents Need to Know About Moke

Specifically, statistics compiled by the National Survey on Drug Use and Health show that teens who smoke cigarettes are five times more likely to drink. They are also 13 times more likely to abuse marijuana, and seven times more likely to abuse drugs like cocaine and heroin. Thus, alcohol abuse and addiction is nine times higher among teens who smoke tobacco than among their peers who do not smoke.

These findings are supported by a report from the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University. The report, titled “Tobacco: The Smoking Gun,” showed that the changes created by nicotine make a teen’s brain more susceptible to the effects of drugs and alcohol.

The brain’s receptors for nicotine increase when smoking, making it more likely for nicotine addiction to develop and making it harder for teens to stop smoking once they start. Moreover, the brain receptors are also altered, which increases the chances of cravings for other drugs. Additionally, the serotonin receptors change, which increases the chance of depression when not smoking.

Furthermore, the report revealed that smokers ages 12 to 17 are twice as likely as non-smokers to experience symptoms of clinical depression.

Marijuana’s Effects on Teen Mental Health

Like tobacco, marijuana use leads to both physical and mental symptoms. Not only is marijuana addictive, it is extremely harmful to users, especially when they are in the critical developmental stages of adolescence. Teenagers’ use of drugs such as marijuana creates chemical changes in the brain, resulting in disruption of mental and physical growth and health.

Regular marijuana use can lead to the following short- and long-term effects:

  • Changes in mood
  • Impaired memory
  • Cognitive difficulties (thinking and problem-solving)
  • Respiratory problems (coughing, lung infections, etc.)
  • Faster heart rate
  • Hallucinations and paranoia
  • Depression and anxiety
  • Suicidal thoughts in teens
  • Decreased IQ: One study showed that people who started smoking marijuana heavily in their teens and continued to use it lost an average of eight IQ points between the ages of 13 and 38.

In conclusion, not only do marijuana and nicotine each have individual consequences for teen mental health, the combination of both has additional effects. It’s important not to underestimate the negative impact of these addictive and life-threatening drugs. Therefore, parents need to help their teens find safe, healthy ways to navigate challenges and feel empowered.

Sources

Inhal Toxicol. 2009 Feb;21(2):87-90.

Drug Alcohol Depend. 2008 Jun 1; 95(3): 199–208.

Behavioural Brain Research. 2015 October 15; Vol. 293: 46–53.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Oct 2;109(40):E2657-64.

National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse

Have you noticed the word “moke” being used lately, in the media and among young people? Moke is a term for a mix of marijuana and tobacco, that can be dangerous for teens.

Moke weed

“Dude you wanna smoke some mokes after school today?”

“That moke just made me zone-out for 5 minutes.”

The Moke Out Mob from Mill Valley, California are people who represent taking fatty moke bong rips.

Anyone (Usually of Hawaiian ancestry) who actively participates in one or more of the following moke activities-
Surfing
Bodyboarding
Bodysurfing with McDonalds Tray
Hawaiian Canoe Paddling
Driving a Lifted Pickup
Listening to Reggae/Jawaiian Music
Playing an ukulele
Stealing shoes/slippahs
Smoking Weed

There is one mandatory qualification though. For one to be a full fledged “moke”, one must be well versed if not fluent in pidgin english.

Hawaiian pidgin for: a big local “braddah”

Someone from Hawaii that is most or all of the following:

Hawaiian or Hawaiian mixed
Big.
Likes to scrap
Likes to drink
Drives a truck
Works construction
Longboards, bodyboards, or bodysurfs
Loves Hawaiian music
Loves to eat
Hates haoles
Goes offroading
Goes hunting (for wild pigs)
Owns a pitbull (or some other bad-ass dog)
Works Security/Bounces
Has a “Proud to Be Hawaiian” sticker on his truck
Cruizes at da beach on his day off
Lives in “da country” outside of the city

Wut, you going Waianae side? Watch out get plenny mokes out dea! No act dumb!!

All da mokes wen chase me outta da watah!!

Hawaiian pidgin describing and/or classifying a male based on their displayed personality traits.

“Moke” can be used to describe a male (usually of Hawiian descent, and/or from/living in Hawaii) who exhibits traits of outgoing, personality type “B”, and/or “bully” style behavior.

Males that cause others to cross the street to avoid them may sometimes be called “mokes”.

Percieved “bullies” may sometimes be called “mokes”.

Agressive, while not always violent behavior, may be exhibited. At the same time, verbal opinions, points of view, comments, and/or exclamations will be expressed using the commonly accepted, Hawaiian pidgin dialect.

While the term “moke” invokes images of negative connotations, this may not always be the case.

Bouncers, security, older brothers/cousins that don’t like you trying to date their little sisters/cousins may also be wrongly classified as “mokes”, due to the fact that they usually scare the user.

Surfers
Bodyboarders
Offroaders
Field workers
Security
Bouncers
Her uncle that hates you
The neighborhood kid who wanna be da kine badd ass
Pot smokers/famers
Bullies
Pitbull Owners (this includes other “bad ass” breeds as well)
Guys that typically cause fear without ever speaking to them
The guys that laughed and/or picked on you in school for being a kook

. are usually labled “mokes”.

Use your imagination to determine what a “moke-ette” can be.

Fo real, J-boy wanna be one kine moke now dat his braddah jes got out.

Sometimes incorrectly spelled ‘moch’, a moke is a bowl of mixed tobacco and marijuana, typically in a single snap of the bowl. Known for its intense, concussive high, a moke is a pleasant and cost-effective experience for the experienced stoner.

Moke, as a term, is most commonly heard in Northern California, particularly in the San Francisco bay area and surrounding communities; the act of smoking marijuana mixed in bowls with tobacco goes by many other names as well, including (but not limited to):
-Mocha bowl
-Mole
-T-rip or T-snap
-Splice bowl
-Spliff bowl (which is just about the worst name ever for a moke)
-Ripper
-Chop
-Slap
-Zorb (more correctly the intense headrush a moke produces should be referred to as a ‘zorb’)
-Mokey
-Pop
-Scooper
-Spin

And the act of having a friend make you a thick, delicious brown snapper is called a ‘Chef Special’

“Bruh, lets go take some mokes and watch Trailer Park Boys”

“There are two rules when it comes to moking. One, if that moke did not physically hurt to take, do it over again until it does. Second, if you ask a friend to make you a small moke, by law he must now make you a fat moke”

Moker #1 “One chef special on the house, please”
Moker #2 “Coming right up, sir”

“Let me take a Brownt Olympus first, then lets go watch the movie”

Person #1 “Hey man do you guys smoke splice bowls out of that bong?”
Person #2 “We smoke mokes here boy, you must smoke cock”

“I saw that one dude with the long hair smoke a moke out of a fuckin steamroller. That’s fucking heinous”

Moke weed “Dude you wanna smoke some mokes after school today?” “That moke just made me zone-out for 5 minutes.” The Moke Out Mob from Mill Valley, California are people who represent