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how to get someone to smoke weed

How to Help Someone Stop Smoking Weed

Do you have a friend or family member who is continuously smoking weed? Are you the parent of someone who seems to rely on weed to get himself (or herself) through the day? It is possible to help a person stop smoking weed.

Like with any drug, the effects of the drug themselves make it very hard for a person to stop once he has developed a dependence on the drug. It can seem very true to the drug-user that he needs the drug every day just to cope with life, just to feel what he considers “normal.” Despite these fixed ways of thinking, on the Narconon program, marijuana addicts have recovered the ability to think clearly, enjoy life and achieve goals again.

Symptoms of Marijuana Abuse

Marijuana use creates euphoria, sedation, lethargy and a feeling of empathy that is not based on real emotions. With high doses or chronic use, a person can suffer memory loss, difficulty paying attention, even panic attacks and hallucinations. He may feel like his senses are sharper but he will lose an accurate sense of speed or distance which can make him a dangerous driver. The loss of inhibitions combined with poor judgment that commonly occurs when stoned may mean that decisions with dangerous consequences may be made, such as the decision to take on a physical challenge that cannot be safely met, or the decision to have unprotected sex.

Of course, many people know that weed use results in loss of coordination that can seem funny at the time. Marijuana is well known for causing the “munchies”—increased appetite for snack foods, especially sweets. The eyes of a marijuana smoker are normally red after he smokes the drug.

What many people do not know is that heavy weed use is increasingly resulting in what has been termed “cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome” which simply means that use of high potency weed can cause people severe, excruciating abdominal pain and violent vomiting that continues for a long period of time. In fact, the only temporary relief seems to come from staying in a hot shower or bath for hours. If a person does not know that the cause of this problem is cannabis or weed, he can continue to cause the problem by smoking more weed. Medical treatment or drugs do not ease the pain or vomiting. The solution is to stop using weed. Doctors are slowly becoming aware of the cause of this problem and are more likely to ask if the person suffering this type of condition is using cannabis.

Problems for Students in Particular

Marijuana abuse is especially popular among young people. Right at the time in their lives when they should be learning and planning careers, marijuana may be sapping their ability to focus, learn, think logically and retain what they have learned. In addition, a person who chronically abuses this drug very often suffers a loss of motivation. Educational goals may become uninteresting and the lethargy and lack of focus resulting from marijuana abuse make it hard to follow through on assignments anyway. Statistically, more young people receive lower grades when they habitually smoked weed. One study showed that of those who had been heavy users completed college less often and had lower incomes after leaving college.

So these points cover how to tell if a person you care about is using weed and what the negative effects of this drug can be. You may already have been aware of some of these problems but didn’t know how to help.

Offering Help

If a person feels that using marijuana is making his life better, you will have a hard time convincing him (or her) to stop smoking the drug. You may have to work with your friend or family member to remind him of the way things were before he began to rely on marijuana to detach him from problems and emotions. Help him compare the way things are now with earlier times when he might have talked about his plans and future with enthusiasm.

You may have to convince him that the dreams he gave up on can still be attained if he quits cannabis use with your help. These earlier dreams and enthusiasms are the key to helping many people envision a new life without drugs, but that new desire may be fleeting. If you get his interest again, you must move quickly to the creation of a new sobriety so these dreams can be renewed.

You will have to work with this person to get him to stop using the drug. He will have to stay away from drug-using and drug-selling friends because most people easily fall back into drug abuse when hanging out with the people still involved in the drug habit.

The withdrawal symptoms he may encounter include:

  • Anger, tension, irritability, restlessness, depression
  • Chills, stomach pains, shaking, sweating
  • Decreased appetite, sleep difficulties, bad dreams, nausea

These symptoms are not normally severe but he may need help resisting the cravings that probably will last for weeks or months. Clearly set goals and the support of sober family and friends can help him stay on a new, creative path toward goals of his own choosing. Nutritional supplementation can help him recover energy and interest in life and help alleviate the symptoms of withdrawal.

What if He Can’t Seem to Quit?

Each year, more than 400,000 people enter rehabs to get help for addiction to marijuana. And these are only the ones entering publicly funded facilities, which means the real total would be higher. Since only about one in ten people who need help for addiction get it, it would be easy to estimate that more than four million people are addicted to this drug. A heavy user may be so drowned in the fog of drug abuse that he can’t quit using the drug when he wants to. In this case, a long-term rehabilitation program that helps a person build a new sober life and the skills to maintain it over the long haul is the answer. This is the service provided by Narconon drug rehabilitation centers around the world.

In many rehabs, prescription drugs make up part of the treatment program. Not at a Narconon center. The entire program is drug-free. Nutritional supplements aid a person in regaining energy and bright viewpoint. A sauna-based detoxification step flushes out the THC (tetrahydrocannabinol, the intoxicating ingredient in weed), helping a person regain the clear thinking they may have left far behind. The life skills segment of the Narconon program walks a person through the learning of the real-life abilities needed to stay sober and achieve goals.

If you are trying to help a person stop smoking weed, you should find out about the Narconon drug and alcohol rehabilitation today. If he can’t stop using the drug on his own, he needs the help of an effective rehab program before any more of his life or talents are wasted, and definitely before he can progress on to use a more heavily addictive drug.

Do you have a friend or family member who is continuously smoking weed? Are you the parent of someone who seems to rely on weed to get himself (or herself) through the day? It is possible to help a person stop smoking weed.

How to Help Your Friends Who Are Smoking Cannabis for the First Time

“The First Time I Got High” is the name of a short story that most of us have written in our heads, but of course the ending is different for just about everyone. In an ideal world, they all have happy endings. Maybe you meet a new crawdad friend, or discover the misunderstood nature of the scorpion, or run around town using dog beds as hats (all of which are true stories according to Leafly reviews).

Unfortunately, not everyone has such a whimsical time. Some first experiences come with anxiety, paranoia, dissociation, racing heart or thoughts, and/or other unpleasant sensations. A bad trip can even be enough to swear off cannabis for a lifetime, so when introducing someone to cannabis for the first time, it’s important that you know how to do so properly.

So listen up, trip sitters. Here’s some semi-obvious advice that will help ensure your smoking buddy will sing songs of cannabis’s glory forevermore (or at least smoke with you a second time).

1. Create a comfortable set and setting.

Think about how much your environment affects you while you’re high: when you’re around your best friend versus a crowd of strangers; when you’re inside versus outside; or when you’re at home versus at a busy grocery store. Setting and mood is everything.

If it’s someone’s first time trying cannabis, help them do so in their happy place. Anxiety-prone individuals might want to try it out at home first with a friend that he/she is comfortable around. Put on some music. Plan an outdoor adventure. Load up on funny movies (may I suggest The Room). Order in food or have a picnic. Boot up Mario Kart.

There are endless ways to design a perfectly chill first-time experience. What’s most important is that the person feels in control of their environment and surrounded by people and activities he/she enjoys.

2. Know that THC sensitivities differ from person to person, and consider a high-CBD strain.

Too many times, I’ve heard heavyweight stoners pushing cannabis on newbies. “Come on, that was a wimpy hit. DO IT AGAIN,” like they’re an initiate at THC boot camp. If someone’s putting THC in their body for the first time, let them process that wimpy hit. That might just be plenty for them at this point.

If your curious friend or family member is iffy on high-THC strains, try offering something high in CBD. A minimally psychoactive strain or product can be the perfect opportunity for one to dip a toe into the world of cannabis. It also helps to demonstrate that cannabis doesn’t have to be about becoming a twice-baked potato. Relaxation and stress relief, it turns out, doesn’t have to cost your ability to function.

3. Don’t whip out the 3-foot bong first.

Unless your friend demands the 3-foot bong because that’s how he/she always pictured this moment, maybe start with something less intimidating. Consider a small pipe, or better yet, a vaporizer. These apparatuses allow for better dose control, and they’re less likely to scorch your buddy’s throat (redemption points for the sensei who keeps throat coat tea with honey on hand, just in case your friend biffs the inhale).

4. If you’re doing edibles, start small. Very small.

I’ll start out by saying that edibles are a bad idea for first timers. Anyone who’s tried cannabis-infused edibles knows that they can push euphoria’s ceiling to the psychedelic heavens, and large doses can drive one into temporary insanity. To the cannabis virgin, even standard doses can be overwhelming.

So, for the love of all things good in this world, start small. Try a 5mg edible (that has been tested and confirmed), and let them ride the peak before introducing more.

5. Key into your friend’s head space and know what to do if they’re having a bad time.

Despite your best efforts to create a perfect first-time experience, sometimes cannabis just doesn’t agree with its consumer. Keep a pulse on your friend’s mood and head space by checking in with them; if they’re experiencing unpleasant symptoms, here are a few ways to help them manage them.

Some people experience increased heart rate, dizziness, headaches, and other unpleasant symptoms, but know that these should pass with time. Most bad trips induced by cannabis manifest simply as anxiety or paranoia (my friends and I like to call this beast “The Fear”). In this instance, try exercising a few of these tips:

  • Relocate to a comfortable place if you aren’t already. Sometimes simply being home solves everything.
  • Relax with music, a hot shower, and/or aromatherapy (black pepper oil is particularly clutch for acute anxiety).
  • Laughter is the great weapon of anxiety; throw on a stupid movie, crack some jokes, or read some really stoned strain reviews.
  • Pump the water. Hydration can help prevent many discomforts caused by cannabis.
  • Get some fresh air. Going for a walk outside and filling your lungs with fresh, clean air can be immensely therapeutic for anyone undergoing anxiety, whether induced by cannabis or not.
  • Try a CBD-only product. CBD is known to counteract some of THC’s anxious side effects, especially when combined with any of the relaxing activities listed above.

And above all, remember that no one on earth has died of a cannabis overdose and everything will be okay. (Besides, if our friend Josh survived a 2,080mg edible, we’re confident your friend will make it, too.)

When you’re introducing someone to cannabis for the first time, it’s important that you know how to do so properly. Find out how.