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arrowhead weed

Syngonium

A creeping or climbing plant with leaves that vary in size, shape and colour depending on their position on the plant. The lower leaves are generally arrowhead-shaped and either entirely green or with some silvery-white markings. The upper leaves are generally light or dark green and divided into three segments or 5-9 separate leaflets the ‘flowers’ consist of an elongated whitish spike that is surrounded by a creamy-white to greenish structure the fleshy fruit are red to reddish-orange in colour and usually hidden.

This species is naturalised in the coastal districts of south-eastern, central and northern Queensland. It currently has a scattered distribution, but is quickly becoming more common and widespread. Possibly also becoming naturalised in south-western Western Australia. Also naturalised on some Pacific islands (i.e. American Samoa, Niue and Hawaii) and in south-eastern USA (i.e. Florida).

Syngonium (Syngonium podophyllum) prefers moist shady conditions and fertile soils. It is a weed of rainforests, closed forests, open woodlands, waterways and riparian areas, roadsides, disturbed sites, waste areas and abandoned gardens in tropical and sub-tropical regions.

A rampant creeper or climbing plant that grows over other vegetation, often reaching 5-10 m or more in height when climbing larger trees.

Syngonium (Syngonium podophyllum) is regarded as an environmental weed in Queensland, and as a potential environmental weed or “sleeper weed” in other parts of northern and eastern Australia.

Syngonium A creeping or climbing plant with leaves that vary in size, shape and colour depending on their position on the plant. The lower leaves are generally arrowhead-shaped and either

How to Kill Arrowhead Weed

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Arrowhead vine (Syngonium podophyllum) is a trailing, broadleaf evergreen plant that grows in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 9 through 11. Arrowhead vine grows well as an indoor plant; however, it becomes an aggressive weed in nature and can smother desirable plants. When used in conjunction with each other, hand pulling and herbicides can kill and control this annoying weed successfully.

Hand Pulling

Wear a pair of heavy work gloves. The sap secreted from the plant can cause skin irritation.

Follow the arrowhead vine to where it emerges from the ground. Grasp the vine as close to the ground level as possible and pull the plant forcefully out of the ground.

Place the vine in a garbage bag and secured close before disposing of the bag in your local landfill. Remove any new arrowhead plants that sprout and dispose of them immediately in a garbage bag.

Herbicides

Fill a clean bucket with 1 gallon of water. Add 1 to 2 ounces of an herbicide containing glyphosate as the active ingredient to the water and mix thoroughly for several seconds.

Pour the mixed solution carefully into a clean pump sprayer.

Spray the leaves of the arrowhead plant with the solution until the foliage is covered, but not to the point of runoff. Place a piece of cardboard next to the plant, if desirable plants are nearby, to use as a protective shield to prevent the herbicide from coming in contact with the plants.

Check the area where the arrowhead plant is growing regularly and spray newly emerged plants with the herbicide solution.

How to Kill Arrowhead Weed. Arrowhead vine (Syngonium podophyllum) is a trailing, broadleaf evergreen plant that grows in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 9 through 11. Arrowhead vine grows well as an indoor plant; however, it becomes an aggressive weed in nature and can smother desirable plants. …